Turning 65

Most people enroll in Medicare when they turn 65 through what’s called their Initial Enrollment Period. Your Initial Enrollment Period is a seven-month period that runs three months before your birth month, your birth month, and three months after your birth month. Your Medicare always starts on the first of the month.

However, you don’t need to enroll in Medicare A or B when you turn 65 if you are still working and have health insurance coverage based on your or your spouse’s active employment, and the employer has more than 20 employees. Generally, in this situation, you are entitled to a Special Enrollment Period when your employment or insurance ends, whichever happens first. During your Special Enrollment Period, you have eight months to enroll in Medicare A & B. Most people, sign up for A & B immediately so there is no gap in their coverage.

We can help you enroll in Medicare and find Supplement or Advantage Plans in person: Click Here or Call 314-890-9200

When you turn 65 and are in the situation above, it may be unwise to enroll in Medicare A if you have a Health Savings Account (HSA) and plan to continue making contributions to your HSA and continue under your Employer Group Coverage. You are not allowed to make contributions to your HSA if you are enrolled in Medicare Part A. Additionally, if you don’t sign up for Medicare Part A when you turn 65, Social Security will backdate your Medicare Part A effective date six months from when you apply for it. You need to make any Health Savings Account contributions before your Medicare Part A effective date.

If you are drawing Social Security benefits, you will be automatically signed up for Medicare Part A. You can’t draw Social Security benefits without enrolling in Medicare Part A. And, if you have Medicare Part A, you can’t contribute to a Health Savings Account. Therefore, if you are drawing Social Security benefits, you cannot make contributions to a Health Savings Account.

Signing Up for Medicare

To sign up during your Initial Enrollment Period, you are required to enroll through the Social Security Administration website, www.ssa.gov, unless you are already drawing Social Security benefits. If you are already drawing Social Security benefits, you will be enrolled automatically in Medicare Parts A and B. You will also receive a Red, White and Blue Medicare Card. You have the option to defer enrolling in Medicare Part B, but you must have Medicare Part A if you are drawing Social Security benefits. This has an impact on HSA contributions as discussed above.

Two Choices

Once you sign up for Medicare Parts A & B, you have two choices on how to receive your Medicare. Click on the links below:

  1. Medicare Advantage Plan
  2. Medicare Supplement Plan + a Medicare Part D Plan